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Monday, 20 June 2016

A Britain and a Europe to believe in

Last week, The Sun urged its readers to BeLEAVE in Britain.

This is my response:

I believe in a Britain in Europe that looks to the future with hope, not to the past with anger.

I believe in a reformed Europe that embraces Britain, and a reformed Britain that embraces Europe. 

I believe in a Britain that is greater than its fears, and a Europe that is more than the sum of its parts.

I believe in a Britain in Europe that cares more for the future prospects of its under-35s than for the rose-tinted memories of its over-65s.

I believe in a Europe that learns from the mistakes of its past and is determined to build a better future.

I believe in a Britain in Europe that wants to work with its neighbours to confront common challenges like climate change, cyber-terrorism and tax evasion, not pretend that it can meet those challenges alone.

I believe in a Europe that welcomes immigrants as new Europeans, and does not reject them as unwanted intruders.

I believe in a Britain in Europe that is proud of its past and wants to be proud of its future.

I believe in a Europe that unites for the long-term benefit of all, not fractures for the short-term gain of the few.

I believe in a Britain in Europe that is ready to be a leader, not afraid to be a loser.


If you share these sentiments, please share them as widely as you can before next Thursday.

4 comments:

Richard Woodcock said...

Bang on - thanks for summing it up perfectly. Shared - fingers crossed.

Hubert Taylor said...

I share Richard Woodcock's and Robin Lustig's #BeIn view; yet, will say 'UK' for RL's "Britain", 'EU' for "Europe", and that while "immigrants" to UK adopt British nationality, they surely remain of their own race and not to be tagged "new Europeans".

Is much of the separatist points sustained by lazy language in schools and beyond?

Anonymous said...

It's interesting that Rupert Murdoch's "Sun" backs leaving whilst his "Times" backs remaining. Is he simply hedging his bets? Is he allowing his editors their independence? Or is he staying on what he believes to be the side of his readers, different as they are for the two papers, so as not to lose their loyalty after the referendum?

Anonymous said...

Dear Robin,

Nice sentiments but I don't think the EU wishes to reform (as shown by the pitiful response to Cameron's efforts to get a deal) or that many Member States wish to "embrace" the UK, they would just like you to keep signing the cheques while remaining one of the less popular/more isolated boys in their club.....